BJS: Bureau of Justice Statistics

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Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
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BJS proposes data collection reinstatement and update: 2018 Police Public Contact Survey

BJS encourages comments for 60 days until February 20, 2018, on a data collection reinstatement and update: 2018 Police Public Contact Survey. Your comments to BJS's requests to the Office of Management and Budget, published in the Federal Register, should address points such as—

  • whether the proposed data collection is necessary, including whether the information will have practical utility
  • the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions
  • whether and how the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected can be enhanced
  • the burden of the information collection on respondents, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques.


Jeffrey H. Anderson imageJeffrey H. Anderson joins BJS as director

Mr. Anderson (left) is a constitutional scholar and is a leader in formulating domestic policy proposals. Mr. Anderson served as a professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy, where he won the USAFA Political Science Department's highest honors for upper-division teaching and for research and writing (for “Learning from the Great Council of Revision Debate”). As the 2017 Project's Executive Director and a Hudson Institute Senior Fellow, Mr. Anderson advanced creative proposals, including Main Street-oriented health-care, tax, and immigration reform. He was Director of the Office of Health Reform at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2017, leading efforts to reduce insurance premiums, regulatory burdens, and opioid abuse. Mr. Anderson co-created the Anderson and Hester Computer Rankings, which were part of the BCS formula to determine college football's annual national championship matchup. Mr. Anderson received a Ph.D. in political science from Claremont Graduate University. 

 

 


BJS's 2016 National Crime Victimization Survey dataset is now available

The National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), in collaboration with BJS, released the 2016 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) dataset. The NCVS was designed to—

  • develop detailed information about the victims and outcomes of crime
  • estimate the number and types of crimes not reported to police
  • provide uniform measures of selected types of crime.


BJS proposes data collection extension: National Crime Victimization Survey

BJS encourages comments for 60 days until February 2, 2018, on the extension of a currently approved data collection: National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). Your comments to BJS's requests to the Office of Management and Budget, published in the Federal Register, should address points such as—

  • whether the proposed data collection is necessary, including whether the information will have practical utility
  • the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions
  • whether and how the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected can be enhanced
  • the burden of the information collection on respondents, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques.


BJS proposes data collection reinstatement and update: 2018 Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies

BJS encourages comments for 60 days until January 16, 2018, on a data collection reinstatement and update: 2018 Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies. Your comments to BJS's requests to the Office of Management and Budget, published in the Federal Register, should address points such as—

  • whether the proposed data collection is necessary, including whether the information will have practical utility
  • the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions
  • whether and how the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected can be enhanced
  • the burden of the information collection on respondents, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques.


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