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Personal Victimization Variable Descriptions



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Age (ager)

The respondent's age on the last day of the month before the interview. The NCVS collects information on household members age 12 or older.

Value Description
1 12 to 14
2 15 to 17
3 18 to 20
4 21 to 24
5 25 to 34
6 35 to 49
7 50 to 64
8 65 or older


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Aggregate type of crime (newcrime)

Personal victimization includes all violent victimization, rape, sexual assault, robbery, assault, and personal theft. This category includes both attempted and completed crimes. Violent victimization is defined as rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, or simple assault. Murder is not measured by the NCVS because of an inability to question the victim. Personal theft/larceny includes purse snatching or pocket picking.

Value Description
1 Violent Victimization
2 Personal Theft/Larceny


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Hispanic Origin (hispanic)

A classification based on Hispanic culture and origin, without considering race.

Value Description
1 Hispanic
2 Non-Hispanic


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Household Income (hincome)

The total income of the household head and all members of the household for the 12 months preceding the interview. Includes wages, salaries, net income from businesses or farms, pensions, interest, dividends, rent, and any other form of monetary income.

Value Description
1 Less than $7,500
2 $7,500 to $14,999
3 $15,000 to $24,999
4 $25,000 to $34,999
5 $35,000 to $49,999
6 $50,000 to $74,999
7 $75,000 or more
88 Unknown


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Injury (injury)

A measure of whether bodily hurt or damage was sustained by a victim as a result of criminal victimization. This applies only to personal victimization where there was contact between the victim and the offender. The types of injuries suffered are used to distinguish between serious and minor assaults. Serious injuries include knife or gunshot wounds, broken bones, loss of teeth, and loss of consciousness. A completed rape is classified as a serious injury. Minor injuries include bruises, black eyes, cuts, scratches, and swelling. Other injuries that can't be identified as serious or minor are distinguished by the amount of hospitalization required. Injuries suffered from an attack during a crime incident include any and all physical (bodily) damage experienced by the victim such as broken bones, bruises, cuts, internal injuries, and so on. Emotional and psychological trauma are not included.

Value Description
0 Not injured
1 Injured


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Location of Incident (locationr)

A measure of where the victimization occurred. This is asked of victims of both personal and household victimization. The locations include at the victim's home; near the victim's home; at or near a friend, neighbor, or relative's home; at a commercial place; in a parking lot or garage; in other public areas (i.e. in open areas, on the street, on public transportation); at school; or somewhere else.

Value Description
1 At or near victim's home
2 At or near friend, neighbor, or relative's home
3 Commercial place, parking lot, or other public area
4 School
5 Other location


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Location of Residence (msa)

The Office of Management and Budget defines this as a population nucleus of 50,000 or more, generally consisting of a city and its immediate suburbs, along with adjacent communities having a high degree of economic and social integration with the nucleus. MSAs are designated by counties, the smallest geographic units for which a wide range of statistical data can be attained. However, in New England, MSAs are designated by cities and towns since these subcounty units are of great local significance and considerable data are available for them. Currently, an area is defined as an MSA if it meets one of two standards: (1) A city has a population of at least 50,000 residents; (2) the Census Bureau defines an urbanized area of at least 50,000 people with a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000 (or 75,000 in New England). The Census Bureau's definition of urbanized areas, data on commuting to work, and the strength of the economic and social ties between the surrounding counties and the central city determine which counties not containing a main city are included in an MSA. For New England, MSAs are determined by a core area and related cities and towns, not counties. A Metropolitan Statistical Area may contain more than one city of 50,000 residents and may cross state lines.

Value Description
1 Urban
2 Suburban
3 Rural


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Marital Status (marital2)

One of the following classifications: (1) married, which includes persons in common-law unions and those who are currently living apart for reasons other than marital discord (e.g., employment and military service); (2) separated or divorced, which includes married persons who are legally separated and those who are not living together because of marital discord; (3) widowed; and (4) never married, which includes persons whose marriages have been annulled and those who are living together and not in a common-law union.

Value Description
1 Never Married
2 Married
3 Widowed
4 Divorced
5 Separated


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Medical Treatment For Physical Injuries (treatment)

Victims who were injured during an incident are asked whether they received any medical care for their injuries. Medical care includes treatment rendered by trained professionals, paraprofessionals, non-professionals and self-treatment.

Value Description
0 Not injured
1 Not treated for injury
2 Treated at scene, home, medical office, or other location


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Population size (popsize)

The size range for the place in which the housing unit is located. "Not a place" is a concentration of population that is not either legally bounded as an incorporated place having an active government or delineated for statistical purposes as a census designated place with definite geographic boundaries such as a city, town, or village

Value Description
0 Not a place
1 Under 100,000
2 100,000-249,999
3 250,000-499,999
4 500,000-999,999
5 1 million or more


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Race (race1R)

Racial categories defined by the Office of Management and Budget are American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and White. Coding for race is White, Black, and Other (this includes American Indians and Alaska Natives; Asians, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders; and persons of two or more races.

Value Description
1 White
2 Black
3 Other


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Race/Hispanic origin (ethnic1R)

Racial categories defined by the Office of Management and Budget are American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and White. Hispanic origin is the classification based on Hispanic culture and origin, without considering race. Coding for race/Hispanic origin is non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic other (this includes American Indians and Alaska Natives; Asians, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders; and persons of two or more races), and Hispanic.

Value Description
1 Non-Hispanic White
2 Non-Hispanic Black
3 Non-Hispanic Other
4 Hispanic


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Region (region)

The States have been divided into four groups or census regions: Northeast, Midwest, South, and West. The Northeast includes the 9 states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The Midwest includes the 12 states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The South includes the District of Columbia and the 16 states of Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. The West includes the 13 states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Value Description
1 Northeast
2 Midwest
3 South
4 West


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Reporting to the police (notify)

Specifies whether the crime was reported to police or not. For the calculation of the household victimization rate by reporting to the police, use the total household population as the denominator.

Value Description
1 Yes, reported to the police
2 No, did not report to the police
3 Do Not Know


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Serious Violent Victimization (seriousviolent)

Rape, sexual assault, personal robbery, or aggravated assault. This category includes both attempted and completed crimes. Murder is not measured by the NCVS because of an inability to question the victim.

Value Description
1 Serious violent victimization
2 Simple assault
3 Personal theft
4 Property crime


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Sex (gender)

The respondent's sex.

Value Description
1 Male
2 Female


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Type of crime (newoff)

Personal victimization includes all violent victimization, rape, sexual assault, personal robbery, assault, and personal theft. This category includes both attempted and completed crimes. Violent victimization includes rape, sexual assault, personal robbery, or assault. Murder is not measured by the NCVS because of an inability to question the victim.

Rape: Unlawful penetration of a person against the will of the victim, with use or threatened use of force, or attempting such an act. Includes psychological coercion and physical force. Forced sexual intercourse means vaginal, anal, or oral penetration by the offender. Also includes incidents where penetration is from a foreign object, such as a bottle. Includes male and female victims, and both heterosexual and homosexual rape. Attempted rape includes verbal threats of rape. (Rape and sexual assault are combined into one victimization measure.)

Sexual assault: A wide range of victimizations, separate from rape or attempted rape. These crimes include attacks or attempted attacks generally involving unwanted sexual contact between victim and offender. Sexual assaults may or may not involve force and include grabbing or fondling. Sexual assault also includes verbal threats. (Rape and sexual assault are combined into one victimization measure.)

Robbery: The unlawful taking or attempted taking of property that is in the immediate possession of another, by force or threat of force, with or without a weapon, and with or without injury.

Aggravated Assault: An attack or attempted attack with a weapon, regardless of whether the victim is injured, or an attack without a weapon when serious injury results.

Simple Assault: An attack or attempted attack without a weapon that results in either no injury, minor injury (e.g., bruises, black eyes, cuts, scratches, or swelling) or an undetermined injury requiring less than 2 days of hospitalization.

Personal theft: Includes purse snatching or pocket picking, which is the theft or attempted theft of property or cash directly from the victim by stealth, without force or threat of force


Value Description
1 Rape/Sexual Assault
2 Robbery
3 Aggravated Assault
4 Simple Assault
5 Personal Theft


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Victim Services (vicservices)

A measure of whether victims received any help or advice from victim service agencies. This is asked of victims of both personal and household victimization. Victim service agencies are publicly or privately funded organizations that provide victims with support and services to aid their physical and emotional recovery, offer protection from future victimizations, guide them through the criminal justice system process, and assist them in obtaining restitution.

Value Description
1 Services received from victim service agencies
2 No services received from victim service agencies


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Victim-offender Relationship (direl)

A classification of a crime victim's relationship to the offender for crimes involving direct contact between the two. For the analysis tool, this applies to crimes that involve contact between the victim and the offender (personal victimization); the distinction is not made for household victimization. For the calculation of the person victimization rate by victim-offender relationship, use the total person population as the denominator.

Value Description
1 Intimates
2 Other relatives
3 Well-known/casual acquaintances
4 Stranger
5 Do not know relationship
6 Do not know number of offenders


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Weapon Use (weapon)

A measure of whether a weapon was used in the victimization. The respondent is asked whether the offender had a weapon. Weapons include items such as guns, knives, and other objects that are used as weapons (for example, rocks, clubs, etc.) This applies only to personal victimizations where there was contact between the victim and the offender. By definition neither simple assault nor personal theft involves a weapon. For the calculation of the person victimization rate by weapon use, use the total person population as the denominator.

Value Description
1 Yes, offender had weapon
2 No, offender did not have weapon
3 Do not know if offender had weapon


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Weapon type (weapcat)

Types of weapons used in the victimization. Weapons include items such as guns, knives, and other objects that are used as weapons (for example, rocks, clubs, etc.). For the calculation of the person victimization rate by weapon type, use the total person population as the denominator.

Value Description
0 No Weapon
1 Firearm
2 Knife
3 Other Type Weapon
4 Type Weapon Unknown
5 Do Not Know if Offender Had Weapon


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Weight (weight)

Weight Definition

Value Description
Population This weight is attached to the person population file and is used to calculate an estimate of persons covered by the NCVS. In a calculation of person victimization rate, the weight is used to determine the denominator.
Victimization The weight used to calculate an estimate of victimizations. In a calculation of victimization rate they are used to determine the numerator. This weight also accounts for high-frequency repeat victimizations, or series victimizations. High-frequency repeat victimizations, or series victimizations, are six or more similar but separate victimizations that occur with such frequency that the victim is unable to recall each individual event or describe event in detail. BJS has decided to count series victimizations using the victim's estimate of the number of times the victimizations occurred over the past 6 months, capping the number within each series at a maximum of 10 victimizations. Including series victimizations in national estimates can substantially increase the number and rate of violent victimization; however, treads in violence are generally similar regardless of whether series victimizations are included.


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Year (year)

Year of Victimization

Value Description
1993-2015 Valid Years



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