BJS: Bureau of Justice Statistics

Home  |  About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Help  |  A-Z Topic List
 
 
Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Home | Indian Country Justice Statistics
Indian Country Justice Statistics
On This Page
About this Topic

The Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010 (TLOA; P.L. 111-211, 124 Stat. 2258, Section 251(b)) requires the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to establish and implement a tribal data collection system and to support tribal participation in national records and information systems. This page serves as a data repository, ensuring these Indian country justice statistics are easily located and accessible from a central source.

BJS Indian country statistics available by category:

  • Victimization
  • Law Enforcement
  • Courts
  • Corrections
  • Criminal Justice Data Improvement Program
  • Related Links and Information

Funding

Through the National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP), BJS provides direct awards and technical assistance to the states and localities to improve the quality, timeliness, and immediate accessibility of criminal history records and related information. Complete records require that data from all components of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement, prosecutors, courts, and corrections be integrated and linked. NCHIP assists states to establish the integrated infrastructure which meets the needs of all components.

The NICS Act Record Improvement Program is intended to improve the completeness, automation, and transmittal of records used by the NICS to state and federal systems. Such records include criminal history records, records of felony convictions, warrants, records of protective orders, convictions for misdemeanor involving domestic violence and stalking, drug arrests and convictions, records of mental health adjudications, and others, which may disqualify an individual from possessing or receiving a firearm under federal law. Helping states and state court systems to automate these records will also reduce delays for law-abiding gun purchasers.

The Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS)furthers the Department’s mission by providing federally-recognized tribes and tribal consortia an opportunity to develop a comprehensive and coordinated approach to public safety and victimization issues and to apply for funding to reduce and prevent crime and victimization.

Data Collections & Surveys

Publications & Products


Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities, 2015 Describes Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010.
  Summary (PDF 205KB) | PDF (790KB) | ASCII file (37KB) | Comma-delimited format (csv) (Zip format 6KB)
Part of the Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities Series

Jails in Indian Country, 2013 Presents findings from the 2013 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of 79 jails, confinement facilities, detention centers, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
  PDF (847K) | ASCII file (42K) | Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 32K)
Part of the Jails in Indian Country Series

Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities, 2014 Describes Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010.
  PDF (465K) | ASCII file (23K)
Part of the Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities Series

Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities, 2013 Describes Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010.
  PDF (888K) | ASCII file (34K) | Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 23K)
Part of the Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities Series

Jails in Indian Country, 2012 Presents findings from the 2012 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of 79 jails, confinement facilities, detention centers, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
  Press Release | PDF (1M) | ASCII file (22K) | Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format)
Part of the Jails in Indian Country Series

Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities, 2012 Describes Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) activities to collect and improve data on crime and justice in Indian country, as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, 2010.
  PDF (1.71M) | ASCII file (23K) | Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 39K)
Part of the Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities Series

Jails in Indian Country, 2011 Presents findings from the 2011 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of 80 jails, confinement facilities, detention centers, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
  Press Release | PDF (1.2M) | ASCII file (23K) | Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 58K)
Part of the Jails in Indian Country Series

Jails in Indian Country, 2010 Presents findings from the 2010 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of all jails, confinement facilities, detention centers, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) on June 30, 2010.
  Press Release | PDF (756K) | ASCII file (36K) | Spreadsheets (Zip format 32K)
Part of the Jails in Indian Country Series

Jails in Indian Country, 2010 NUMBER OF DEATHS IN LOCAL JAILS DECLINED IN 2008 AND 2009 Mortality rate in state prisons stable since 2003
  Press Release
Part of the Jails in Indian Country Series

Compendium of Tribal Crime Data, 2011 Focuses on BJS's existing data on key criminal justice issues in Indian country and addresses gaps in tribal crime data.
 

Terms & Definitions

Criminal jurisdiction in Tribal areas Jurisdiction over offenses in Indian country may lie with federal, state, or tribal agencies depending upon the particular offense, the offender, the victim, and the offense location. For more information on tribal jurisdiction, see Census of Tribal Justice Agencies in Indian Country, 2002 (NCJ 205332) and also Jails in Indian Country (NCJ 1932400).
 
Indian country Statutory term that includes all lands within an Indian reservation, dependent Indian communities, and Indian trust allotments (18 U.S.C. § 1151). Courts interpret § 1151 to include all lands held in trust for tribes or their members. See United States v. Roberts, 185 F.3d 1125 (10th Cir. 1999). Tribal authority to imprison American Indian offenders is limited to one year per offense by statute (25 U.S.C. § 1302), a $5,000 fine, or both.
 
Indian country jails Indian country adult and juvenile detention centers, jails, and other correctional facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Public Law 83-280 (commonly referred to as Public Law 280 or P.L. 280) Establishes criminal justice responsibilities among American Indian tribes with tribal land, the states in which tribes are located, and the federal government. Public Law 280 is mandatory or optional for 204 tribes, about two-thirds of the total in the lower 48 states. In states where P.L. 280 does not apply, the federal government retains criminal jurisdiction for major crimes committed under the Indian Country Crimes Act (Title 18, United States Code, Section 1152), the Indian Country Major Crimes Act (Title 18, United States Code, Section 1153), and the Assimilative Crimes Act (Title 18, United States Code, Section 13).
 
Public Law 93-638 The Indian Self-Determination of Act 1975, affords tribes the opportunity to provide for their own police departments and other institutional services through federal grants and contracts.
 
Related Links

Additional Info

Tribal violent offense known to law enforcement, by state

Tribal property offense known to law enforcement, by state